Author Archives: Nicholas Bagley

Trump’s Sabotage of Obamacare Is Illegal

by Nicholas Bagley — Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018

So runs the headline of an op-ed that I co-authored with Abbe Gluck of Yale Law School in the New York Times. Here’s an excerpt: Never in modern American history has a president so transparently aimed to destroy a piece of major legislation. What makes Mr. Trump’s sabotage especially undemocratic is that Congress has repeatedly […]

This entry was tagged .

The Right Thing on Risk Adjustment

by Nicholas Bagley — Wednesday, July 25, 2018

It took a crisis to spur the Trump administration to action, but it did finally act. Yesterday evening, HHS released a rule addressing a New Mexico judge’s concerns with the risk adjustment program. If all goes well—more on that in a moment—the new rule should put an end to risk adjustment fiasco. To bring you […]

This entry was tagged .

Taking a Dive on Risk Adjustment

by Nicholas Bagley — Monday, July 9, 2018

On Friday evening, the Wall Street Journal reported that the Trump administration would be suspending risk adjustment payments due for 2017 and 2018. The next day, CMS scurried to clarify that the suspension was a necessary response to an adverse court judgment out of New Mexico. “As a result of this litigation,” Administrator Seema Verma […]

This entry was tagged .

A puzzle about standing, resolved.

by Nicholas Bagley — Tuesday, June 26, 2018

A few weeks back, I raised a question about Texas’s latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act: do the plaintiffs even have standing to sue? Now that the Justice Department has thrown in the towel and declined to the defend the statute, that question has become a lot more urgent. To demonstrate standing, Texas and […]

This entry was tagged .

Health insurance is complicated. In many states, it’s about to get worse.

by Nicholas Bagley — Monday, June 25, 2018

That’s the opening of a piece of mine in the Wall Street Journal (gated, unfortunately) about what states should do in response to the Trump administration’s anticipated relaxation of rules governing short-term plans. Where states allow short-term plans without restriction, the plans will be a lot cheaper than those sold on the exchanges because they don’t have to comply with the ACA. But that low price comes with […]

This entry was tagged .

The severability question is not hard.

by Nicholas Bagley — Monday, June 25, 2018

In a lengthy blog post about the Texas lawsuit that’s trying to bring down the ACA, Josh Blackman takes aim at an amicus brief filed by a bipartisan group of law professors (including me). The brief argues that the Affordable Care Act should stand, even if the penalty-free individual mandate is held unconstitutional. Blackman isn’t […]

This entry was tagged .

The case that could end the Texas lawsuit.

by Nicholas Bagley — Friday, June 15, 2018

A slew of amicus briefs were filed yesterday in the Texas lawsuit, almost every one of them pushing back on the argument that the Affordable Care Act should be invalidated, in whole or in part. (I filed one myself, together with a bipartisan group of law professors.) Today, I wanted to highlight one of those […]

This entry was tagged .

Amicus brief in the Texas ACA case

by Nicholas Bagley — Thursday, June 14, 2018

Together with a bipartisan group of law professors—Jonathan Adler, Abbe Gluck, Ilya Somin, and Kevin Walsh—I submitted an amicus brief today in the Texas litigation over the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. Joe Palmore at Morrison and Foerster graciously helped to pull the brief together; he did characteristically excellent work. The amicus brief doesn’t […]

This entry was tagged .

A Big Loss for Insurers in the Risk Corridor Litigation.

by Nicholas Bagley — Thursday, June 14, 2018

Today was a bad day for insurers seeking more than $12 billion in risk corridor money from the United States. Over a dissent, the Federal Circuit ruled that the federal government doesn’t owe them a cent. (I’ve been following the litigation for a long time; you can catch up on my prior posts here.) The […]

This entry was tagged .

The Texas lawsuit could end some of the ACA’s protections for employer coverage.

by Nicholas Bagley — Thursday, June 14, 2018

The Trump administration’s refusal to defend portions of the Affordable Care Act is shocking enough. Equally shocking is how little it seems to care what happens if it gets what it’s asking for. One question in particular: what about legal protections for the 160 million people who get insurance through their employers? Will their insurance […]

This entry was tagged .