Category Archives: Symposia

The NIEO 2.0?, by Susan K. Sell

by Guest Blogger — Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018

Sam Halabi’s Intellectual Property and the New International Economic Order offers an original take on seemingly disparate efforts by developing countries to push back against overly strong intellectual property rules and the oligopoly power of intellectual property-intensive firms. He revisits the 1970s and 1980s debates over a New International Economic Order (NIEO) that reflected keen […]

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Key Insights from Intellectual Property and the New International Economic Order, by Peter Yu

by Guest Blogger — Monday, Oct. 8, 2018

In a world with ever-sprawling developments involving intellectual property rights, Sam Halabi’s new book, Intellectual Property and the New International Economic Order, could not have been published at a better time. This well-written, passionately argued, historically informed and highly interdisciplinary book covers issues ranging from pharmaceutical development to agricultural production and from biological diversity to […]

Expanding Shelters into Protective Zones – the Three Step Test and State (and other) Practice in Developing International Copyright Law, By Henning Grosse Ruse – Khan

by Guest Blogger — Monday, Oct. 8, 2018

It’s great to be part of this blog symposium on Sam’s excellent monograph on IP and the New International Economic Order (NIEO). As the title of my post suggests, I’ll focus on taking the idea of IP ‘shelters’ further, looking at strategies for expanding them into broader, ideally globally recognised zones that protect the basic […]

International Intellectual Property Shelters Support a “Basic Needs Approach” to IP, by J. Janewa Osei-Tutu

by Guest Blogger — Friday, Oct. 5, 2018

My thanks to Chris Walker for organizing this symposium to facilitate this conversation about Sam Halabi’s new book, Intellectual Property and the New International Economic Order, which has been published by Cambridge University Press. I enjoyed reading this book, and I will be keeping a copy on my shelves. For scholars who are interested in […]

International IP Shelters: A Regulatory or Deregulatory Move?

by Chris Walker — Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018@chris_j_walker

I am not, as Jeff Pojanowski described himself in his contribution to this symposium, an “administrative law scholar in the fustiest sense of the term.” Sure, I too have written about Chevron deference and judicial review. But I pride myself as a scholar who researches in the bureaucratic trenches, examining how administrative law actually works in […]

Duck, Duck, Goose: The Potential Perils of “Intellectual Property” Conglomeration, by Patricia L. Judd

by Guest Blogger — Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018

As I stated in my introductory post a few days ago, Sam Halabi’s new book on Intellectual Property and the New International Economic Order engages us in a hopeful conversation, and I am grateful to him for that. It is crucial that scholars of various disciplines continue engage on these issues of vast importance. As […]

Why Do Nations Obey International IP Law?

by Daniel Hemel — Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018

The wealth of nations lies largely in intangible form. The World Bank estimated in a 2011 report that intangible capital constituted more than three quarters of the world’s wealth. And the distribution of intangible capital is highly uneven. Estimates from the same World Bank report indicate that high-income OECD countries, which account for approximately 14% […]

Exploring the Regulatory World, by Jeffrey Pojanowski

by Guest Blogger — Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018

I am administrative law scholar in the fustiest sense of the term. I write about judicial review of agency action, with a particular focus on questions of law. Yes. I am one of those bores who writes about Chevron. I do this while being well aware that so much (most?) of the important thinking in […]

Food For Thought From Halabi’s New International Economic Order, by Katja Weckström Lindroos

by Guest Blogger — Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018

My shelves are full of books with colorful stickers and scribbles in the margins. I’ve had heated discussions with the authors, which unfortunately (for all the wrong reasons) remain fictional and trapped in my head. I would like to thank Chris Walker and the Yale Journal on Regulation’s Notice and Comment team for creating the […]

The Logic of Institutional Change: A Comment on Halabi’s Intellectual Property and the New International Economic Order

by Peter Conti-Brown — Monday, Oct. 1, 2018

Don’t let the title deceive you: this is not simply a book about international intellectual property law (though it is obviously at least that). Sam’s rich account of the asymmetries in international intellectual property protections and the ways that poorer countries fight back bears on a cross-disciplinary conversation in institutional change that is worth highlighting, […]

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