Law Library of Congress’s Congress.gov Webinar – January 25, 2018

by Chris Walker — Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018@chris_j_walker

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If you’re looking for an introduction or quick refresher on the Congress.gov resource, the Law Library of Congress has a free webinar scheduled for next week. For those who teach legislation, Congress.gov also has a great collection of short videos on the legislative process that are available here.

You can register for the webinar here, with details also reproduced below:

Congress.gov, the successor to THOMAS.gov, was launched Sept. 19, 2012. This orientation is designed to give a basic overview of the website. While the focus of the session will be searching legislation and the Congressional member information attached to the legislation, the new features of Congress.gov will be highlighted as well.

NOTE: YOU MUST PREPARE YOUR COMPUTER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS WEBINAR. To view the program, you will be using WebEx software, either by installing a plug-in or via their “temporary file solution.” If you have the administrator rights to your computer, you may choose to install a plugin in advance. If you cannot or do not want to install the plugin, you will be directed to the temporary file solution when you click on the link for the webinar. This will allow you to download a file. You will then double click the file that you downloaded in order to join the webinar.

A page with information to set up your computer is here.

Please request ADA accommodations at least five business days in advance by contacting (202) 707-6362 or ada@loc.gov.

Cite As: Author Name, Title, 36 Yale J. on Reg.: Notice & Comment (date), URL.

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About Chris Walker

Christopher Walker is a law professor at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. Prior to joining the law faculty, Professor Walker clerked for Justice Anthony Kennedy of the U.S. Supreme Court and worked on the Civil Appellate Staff at the U.S. Department of Justice. His publications have appeared in the California Law Review, Michigan Law Review, Stanford Law Review, and University of Pennsylvania Law Review, among others. Outside the law school, he serves as one of forty Public Members of the Administrative Conference of the United States and on the Governing Council for the American Bar Association’s Section on Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice. He blogs regularly at the Yale Journal on Regulation.

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