Tag Archives: Federal Reserve

The Fed (Like Soylent Green) Is Made of People, by Emily S. Bremer

by Guest Blogger — Wednesday, Apr. 6, 2016

My thanks to Chris Walker for organizing this symposium and inviting me to participate. It’s a pleasure to be involved and an honor to be among such an impressive line-up of scholars and experts. Like yesterday morning’s contributor, Sam Halabi, the Federal Reserve System is not my area of expertise, but I very much enjoyed […]

Conti-Brown’s “Independence” and Institutional Design: Lessons from and for the FDA

by Sam Halabi — Tuesday, Apr. 5, 2016

Let me begin by echoing Daniel’s thanks to Chris, the Yale Journal on Regulation’s Notice and Comment team, and Peter for the opportunity to reach outside my scholarly comfort zone and hopefully play a useful role in illuminating the importance of Peter’s book not only for scholars of the Federal Reserve system but the legal […]

Conti-Brown’s “Independence” and Institutional Design: Lessons from and for the FDA, by Sam Halabi

by Guest Blogger — Tuesday, Apr. 5, 2016

Let me begin by echoing Daniel’s thanks to Chris, the Yale Journal on Regulation’s Notice and Comment team, and Peter for the opportunity to reach outside my scholarly comfort zone and hopefully play a useful role in illuminating the importance of Peter’s book not only for scholars of the Federal Reserve system but the legal […]

Maybe the Federal Reserve Banks Are Constitutional After All, by Daniel Hemel

by Daniel Hemel — Monday, Apr. 4, 2016

Thanks to Chris Walker for organizing this online symposium, to the editors of the Yale Journal on Regulation for hosting it on their site, and—most of all—to Peter Conti-Brown for writing a brilliant book. In this post, I’ll take issue with one of Peter’s conclusions—that “the [Federal] Reserve Banks are almost certainly unconstitutional” (p. 107)—but […]

Introduction: Symposium on Peter Conti-Brown’s The Power and Independence of the Federal Reserve

by Chris Walker — Monday, Apr. 4, 2016@chris_j_walker

I’m excited to announce that over the next week or so we will be hosting an online symposium reviewing my co-blogger Peter Conti-Brown’s important new book The Power and Independence of the Federal Reserve , which was just published by the Princeton University Press. Here’s an overview of the book from the publisher’s website: The […]

The Three Waves of Professionalization at the Federal Reserve: the Role of the Lawyers

by Peter Conti-Brown — Wednesday, Mar. 23, 2016

Most of official Washington is focused on the vacancy at the Supreme Court, but for watchers of financial regulation and central banking a new vacancy is surely more important: Thomas Baxter, the long-time general counsel at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York has announced his retirement. He’s a New York Fed lifer—his retirement comes at […]

On Writing Books

by Peter Conti-Brown — Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016

After more than six years of work, my book The Power and Independence of the Federal Reserve was recently published by Princeton University Press. I’ll be blogging on its content in the weeks ahead, so I won’t pregame those posts here. Instead, I wanted to discuss a topic that might be of interest to some […]

Do the Banks Own the Federal Reserve? Let’s Finally Make the Answer a Resounding No

by Peter Conti-Brown — Thursday, Dec. 10, 2015

Anyone who has done research on the U.S. Federal Reserve System and who has ventured into an old-fashioned library will notice something remarkable: the shelves in the HG 2500 section of the library veritably groan under the weight of conspiratorial tomes. These range from the absurd (about international cabals that control the Fed and the […]

The Administration’s Frustrating Failure to Nominate a Fed Vice Chair for Bank Supervision

by Peter Conti-Brown — Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015

As the Chair of the powerful Senate Banking Committee, Senator Richard Shelby (R-AL) is one of the most important figures in Washington and Wall Street. Among his targets is reforming the Fed, including the Fed’s governance. Recently, Senator Shelby has announced that he has a bone to pick with the Obama Administration on this score. […]

Wallach vs. Conti-Brown on the Fed and Lehman: What did we learn?

by Peter Conti-Brown — Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2015

Pardon my long hiatus from blogging. The reason was a move, from Princeton, NJ where I was working (and will continue to work) on my PhD in financial history, to Philadelphia, PA, where I am now an assistant professor at Wharton/Penn, teaching in the Legal Studies and Business Ethics Department (those who follow any aspect […]