Tag Archives: Justice Scalia

Scalia and Chevron: Not Drawing Lines, But Resolving Tensions

by Adam White — Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016

Among the many reasons for mourning Justice Scalia’s untimely passing (on which I’ve written at length elsewhere) is the fact that his death abruptly cut short his late-career reconsiderations of the administrative state. As Aaron Nielson observes, recent years had seen Justice Scalia expressing serious doubts about judicial deference to agency interpretations of their own […]

What King v. Burwell Means for Statutory Interpretation

by Chris Walker — Thursday, June 25, 2015@chris_j_walker

This morning I blogged about what the 6-3 decision in King v. Burwell means for administrative law (post here). Part of my conclusion there is that the Court’s decision in King chips away at the bright-line rule-based approach to Chevron deference—an approach Justice Scalia has championed—by reinvigorating the major questions doctrine. King, however, constitutes a major […]

Perez v. Mortgage Bankers Association: The Future of Auer Deference

by Chris Walker — Monday, Mar. 23, 2015@chris_j_walker

Last week my co-blogger Jeff Pojanowski and I participated in a Federalist Society teleforum (moderated by Adam White) on the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Perez v. Mortgage Bankers Association. In Mortgage Bankers, the Court held in a unanimous decision that a federal agency is not required to use notice-and-comment rulemaking to revise a prior interpretation […]

Debating Daniel Deacon on Title II Reclassification

by Gus Hurwitz — Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2015

Daniel Deacon’s recent Notice & Comment post does a nice job of laying out the legal basis that will likely be used by FCC Chairman Wheeler’s proposed Open Internet (a/k/a net neutrality) rules. And his analysis of this legal basis reflects conventional wisdom. He is right that it is reasonably likely that the courts will […]

Should Courts Defer to Administrative Interpretations of Criminal Law?

by Chris Walker — Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014@chris_j_walker

Yesterday in a short statement respecting the denial of certiorari in Whitman v. United States, Justice Scalia — joined by Justice Thomas — raised an interesting question about whether “a court owe[s] deference to an executive agency’s interpretation of a law that contemplates both criminal and administrative enforcement.”  Here are some highlights (citations omitted): I doubt the […]